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One of the 14 different bars on Queen Mary 2 is the elegant Wintergarden on deck 7. Guests will be able to enjoy classical concerts, formal tea time, the trickling of a fountain and a nice trompe d'oeuil ceiling here. Done in a conservatory style, inspired by famous Kew Gardens east of London, the room seats 270 in comfort. The use of rattan furniture and floral prints give the Wintergarden a distinct touch, but in my opinion the theme would have worked better if the ceiling would have been higher. On a ship with so many vast, high-ceiling rooms, the Wintergarden feels a little cramped.  However, during my overnight this room was in constant use and I would not be surprised if it turns into a very popular spot over the months to come. 

Lovers of a brew or two will head for deck 2, where a circular lobby and a huge chandelier welcomes guests to the Golden Lion, Cunard's upscale version of a traditional British Pub. Featuring live music and even pub food (fish 'n chips, shepherd's pie and the likes), the Golden Lion was positively crowded during the pre-inaugural festivities.

Should you be in search of something a little more peaceful, move up one deck and enter the Chart Room. This spacious room seats 75 and is perfect for pre-dinner drinks or late night cocktails. At first glance, the large green backlit panels look like empty aquariums but a closer inspection reveal interesting nautical maps of Southampton and New York. Opposite the Chart Room is my favorite bar: Sir Samuel's. I love its vibrant decor here, with the combination of shining parquet flooring and daring bold carpeting. In Sir Samuel's Wine Cellar, QM2's huge collection of fine wines is at display.

After beer and wine we arrive in champagne territory when entering the Veuve Clicquot Champagne Bar on deck 3. Managed by the brand of the same name, the spacious room seats 61 and is Cunard's first champagne bar. The room is open to the Grand Lobby and the rather bland use of colors and materials make it look less attractive for me. Perhaps a dusting of glitz & glamour would not be completely out of tune. 

Wintergarden
Wintergarden
Wintergarden
Wintergarden
Golden Lion Pub

The Chart Room

The Chart Room

Sir Samuel's Wine Bar

Wintergarden waterfall
Wintergarden
Wintergarden
Entrance to the Golden Lion Pub
Sir Samuel's Wine Bar

Sir Samuel's Wine Bar

Veuve Clicquot Champagne Bar

Veuve Clicquot Champagne Bar

 

Guests not wanting to head to the reserved table in their respected dining room might want to report to King's Court, Queen Mary 2's vast casual dining area. Located amidships on deck 7 and overlooking the teak Promenade Deck, King's Court serves up a no-frills self-service breakfast and lunch.

At night, each of King's Court four distinct areas serves up different fare. At La Piazza you can choose between your favorite Italian specialties. At The Carvery a traditional British roast is served, while Lotus offers a choice of Asian food. Finally, you can see the kitchen brigade at work in the Chef's Galley, one of the first seagoing demonstration kitchens. The decor of King's Court is inviting, clean and uncluttered and I very much like the intimate seating areas in the large bay windows overlooking the Promenade Deck. That said, the (very!) brightly lit buffet tables are placed smack in the middle of the room and there was some congestion in the morning when we enjoyed breakfast here. However, it must be said that the space between tables is very good, with Cunard again providing many tables for two.

King's Court

King's Court
King's Court
King's Court demonstration kitchen
King's Court

King's Court

Entrance to the King's Court

King's Court
King's Court
King's Court

 

All photos and text: 2004 www.ShipParade.com. All rights reserved.

First published on January 31st, 2004. All rights reserved.